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Fraud Prevention

If you read the newspapers every day you see evidence of a disturbing consequence of the economic downturn. Identity theft, white collar crime, fraud and many other similar crimes are on the rapid rise. We mention this NOT because we think everyone is being robbed blind by their staff, neighbours and or some crime syndicate but because the old adage “forewarned is forearmed” definitely applies here.

The most recent occurrence we noticed was a Engineering Company had $1.5 Million stolen by an employee that was buying computers through the company’s purchasing system and was then selling them and pocketing the cash. Next time you get a request from our office to provide copies of fixed assets purchased during the year think of this case and understand why we ask and review fixed assets every year for our business clients.

We have listed a few broad stroke points below. They apply to everyone whether they are in business, employed, in university or retired. Admittedly, most are focused on small business but they can and do apply to everyone:

  1. Make sure the bank has your correct mailing address
  2. Pick up, open and examine all of your mail YOURSELF!!!
  3. NEVER be in too big a rush, when signing cheques, to carefully examine the invoices the cheque is paying (they should be attached to the cheque you are being asked to sign) and ask questions about them BEFORE you sign the cheque.
  4. NEVER sign blank cheques.
  5. Do not use bank accounts that do not offer to return copies of all withdrawals from your account either in electronic or original paper format.
  6. ALWAYS examine the cancelled vouchers in your bank statement every month to ensure the front, back and payee signatures match and are valid.
  7. Always make sure the signature on the front of the cheque is yours.
  8. Carefully examine your credit card statements and attach the original charge slips to each one. If something doesn’t look right REPORT it to the credit card company IMMEDIATELY!!!
  9. Bad guys are sending what look like invoices and bills that say you owe them money. If you are not sure that you owe them for goods and or services, call them, or call us. Happy to help
  10. Even if you have a bookkeeper you should do the above at least every second or third month. You are NOT doubting them. They have a serious responsibility and are your trusted staff. Looking after yourself occasionally is a good thing.

Do everything above and if all is well and your staff is doing a great job give them a slap on the back and say thank you, if there is any problem or something confuses you, talk it over with them and clear up the problem now rather than later. If you think a second set of eyes is necessary give us a call and we will help point you in the right direction.

Tax Alerts

Millions of Canadians receive payments each month from the federal government and for younger Canadians, especially families with children, such payments will often include the monthly Canada Child Benefit (CCB).


Achieving charitable registration status is a significant step, and a significant benefit, to any organization. The organization itself becomes exempt from income tax and, in addition, is able to issue tax receipts for donations made to it, which allow donors to claim a federal and provincial tax credit based on the amount of such donations. The ability to issue such tax receipts gives a charitable organization a measurable advantage when it comes to fundraising.


Sometime around the middle of August, millions of Canadians will receive unexpected mail from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), and that mail will contain unfamiliar and unwelcome news. Specifically, the enclosed form will advise the recipient that, in the view of the CRA, he or she should make instalment payments of income tax on September 15 and December 15 of 2018 — and will helpfully identify the amounts which should be paid on each date.


Between February and July 2018, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) received and processed just over 28 million individual income tax returns filed for the 2017 tax year. The CRA’s self-imposed processing turnaround goal for each of those returns is to complete its assessment and to issue a Notice of Assessment within two to six weeks, depending on the filing method.