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Fraud Prevention

If you read the newspapers every day you see evidence of a disturbing consequence of the economic downturn. Identity theft, white collar crime, fraud and many other similar crimes are on the rapid rise. We mention this NOT because we think everyone is being robbed blind by their staff, neighbours and or some crime syndicate but because the old adage “forewarned is forearmed” definitely applies here.

The most recent occurrence we noticed was a Engineering Company had $1.5 Million stolen by an employee that was buying computers through the company’s purchasing system and was then selling them and pocketing the cash. Next time you get a request from our office to provide copies of fixed assets purchased during the year think of this case and understand why we ask and review fixed assets every year for our business clients.

We have listed a few broad stroke points below. They apply to everyone whether they are in business, employed, in university or retired. Admittedly, most are focused on small business but they can and do apply to everyone:

  1. Make sure the bank has your correct mailing address
  2. Pick up, open and examine all of your mail YOURSELF!!!
  3. NEVER be in too big a rush, when signing cheques, to carefully examine the invoices the cheque is paying (they should be attached to the cheque you are being asked to sign) and ask questions about them BEFORE you sign the cheque.
  4. NEVER sign blank cheques.
  5. Do not use bank accounts that do not offer to return copies of all withdrawals from your account either in electronic or original paper format.
  6. ALWAYS examine the cancelled vouchers in your bank statement every month to ensure the front, back and payee signatures match and are valid.
  7. Always make sure the signature on the front of the cheque is yours.
  8. Carefully examine your credit card statements and attach the original charge slips to each one. If something doesn’t look right REPORT it to the credit card company IMMEDIATELY!!!
  9. Bad guys are sending what look like invoices and bills that say you owe them money. If you are not sure that you owe them for goods and or services, call them, or call us. Happy to help
  10. Even if you have a bookkeeper you should do the above at least every second or third month. You are NOT doubting them. They have a serious responsibility and are your trusted staff. Looking after yourself occasionally is a good thing.

Do everything above and if all is well and your staff is doing a great job give them a slap on the back and say thank you, if there is any problem or something confuses you, talk it over with them and clear up the problem now rather than later. If you think a second set of eyes is necessary give us a call and we will help point you in the right direction.

Tax Alerts

While there weren’t a great number of tax measures included in the 2018 Fall Economic Statement brought down by the Minister of Finance on November 21, 2018, the tax changes that were announced represented good news for Canadian businesses.


Most Canadians know that the deadline for making contributions to one’s registered retirement savings plan (RRSP) comes after the end of the calendar year, around the end of February. There are, however, some instances an RRSP contribution must be (or should be) made by December 31st, in order to achieve the desired tax result, as follows.


For individual Canadian taxpayers, the tax year ends at the same time as the calendar year. And what that means for individual Canadians is that any steps taken to reduce their tax payable for 2018 must be completed by December 31, 2018. (For individual taxpayers, the only significant exception to that rule is registered retirement savings plan contributions, which can be made any time up to and including March 1, 2019, and claimed on the return for 2018.)


The holiday season is usually costly, but few Canadians are aware that those costs can include increased income tax liability resulting from holiday gifts and celebrations. It doesn’t seem entirely in the spirit of the season to have to consider possible tax consequences when attending holiday celebrations and receiving gifts; however, our tax system extends its reach into most areas of the lives of Canadians, and the holidays are no exception. Fortunately, the possible negative tax consequences are confined to a minority of fact situations and relationships, usually involving employers and employees, and are entirely avoidable with a little advance planning.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


Getting a post-secondary education – or professional training – isn’t inexpensive. Tuition costs can range from as little as $5,000 per year for undergraduate studies to as much as $40,000 in tuition for a year of professional education. And those costs don’t factor in necessary expenditures on textbooks and other ancillary costs, to say nothing of general living expenses, like rent, transportation and food.


When the Canada Pension Plan was launched in the mid-1960s, both the working lives and the retirements of Canadians looked a lot different than they do in 2018. Fifty years ago, most Canadians were able to work at a single full-time job, often held that job for most or all of their working lives and, in many cases, benefitted from an employer sponsored defined benefit pension plan which guaranteed a certain level of income in retirement.


Most Canadians deal with our tax system only once a year, when preparing the annual tax return. And, while that return – the T1 Individual Income Tax Return – may be only four pages long, the information on those four pages is supported by 13 supplementary federal schedules, dealing with everything from the calculation of the tax-free gain on the sale of a principal residence to the determination of required Canada Pension Plan contributions by self-employed taxpayers.


Anyone who has ever tried to reduce their overall personal or household debt knows that doing so, no matter how disciplined one’s approach, can seem like a one step forward, two steps back proposition. It sometimes seems that, just as measurable progress is achieved in one area (an extra payment is made on the mortgage), unexpected costs in another area (a significant car repair bill) push up the level of debt elsewhere (e.g., credit card debt).