Français

Newsletters

Fraud Prevention

If you read the newspapers every day you see evidence of a disturbing consequence of the economic downturn. Identity theft, white collar crime, fraud and many other similar crimes are on the rapid rise. We mention this NOT because we think everyone is being robbed blind by their staff, neighbours and or some crime syndicate but because the old adage “forewarned is forearmed” definitely applies here.

The most recent occurrence we noticed was a Engineering Company had $1.5 Million stolen by an employee that was buying computers through the company’s purchasing system and was then selling them and pocketing the cash. Next time you get a request from our office to provide copies of fixed assets purchased during the year think of this case and understand why we ask and review fixed assets every year for our business clients.

We have listed a few broad stroke points below. They apply to everyone whether they are in business, employed, in university or retired. Admittedly, most are focused on small business but they can and do apply to everyone:

  1. Make sure the bank has your correct mailing address
  2. Pick up, open and examine all of your mail YOURSELF!!!
  3. NEVER be in too big a rush, when signing cheques, to carefully examine the invoices the cheque is paying (they should be attached to the cheque you are being asked to sign) and ask questions about them BEFORE you sign the cheque.
  4. NEVER sign blank cheques.
  5. Do not use bank accounts that do not offer to return copies of all withdrawals from your account either in electronic or original paper format.
  6. ALWAYS examine the cancelled vouchers in your bank statement every month to ensure the front, back and payee signatures match and are valid.
  7. Always make sure the signature on the front of the cheque is yours.
  8. Carefully examine your credit card statements and attach the original charge slips to each one. If something doesn’t look right REPORT it to the credit card company IMMEDIATELY!!!
  9. Bad guys are sending what look like invoices and bills that say you owe them money. If you are not sure that you owe them for goods and or services, call them, or call us. Happy to help
  10. Even if you have a bookkeeper you should do the above at least every second or third month. You are NOT doubting them. They have a serious responsibility and are your trusted staff. Looking after yourself occasionally is a good thing.

Do everything above and if all is well and your staff is doing a great job give them a slap on the back and say thank you, if there is any problem or something confuses you, talk it over with them and clear up the problem now rather than later. If you think a second set of eyes is necessary give us a call and we will help point you in the right direction.

Tax Alerts

Tax-free savings accounts (TFSAs) have been part of the Canadian tax system now for nearly a decade, and millions of Canadians utilize them as a savings vehicle, whether for short-term or long-term purposes.

Of all of the tax-deferral or tax-savings plans available to Canadians, TFSAs undoubtedly provide the greatest flexibility, as the TFSA rules allow taxpayers to both carryover allowable contribution room to future years and to re-contribute amounts withdrawn. However, that very flexibility (especially the ability to re-contribute previous withdrawals) also has the potential to cause taxpayers to run afoul of the rules by getting into an inadvertent overcontribution position, resulting in the imposition of penalty taxes.


As the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) notes on its website, new tax scams are devised every single day of the week. And, despite the cautionary tales which appear frequently in the media and the warnings posted by the CRA on its website, Canadians continue, with regularity, to fall victim to each new (and old) tax scam and tax fraud.


The variety of amounts and kinds of income, deductions taken, and credits claimed on individual income tax returns filed by Canadians each spring is almost limitless. Each of those returns, however, has one thing in common, and that is that each will be assessed by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), which will then issue a Notice of Assessment summarizing the Agency’s conclusions with respect to the information filed by the taxpayer. Most important, from the taxpayer’s point of view, the CRA will communicate the amount of federal and provincial tax it believes the taxpayer is required to pay for the tax year just passed.


By now, halfway through the 2017 tax year, almost all Canadian individual taxpayers will have filed their income tax return for 2016, and most will have received the Notice of Assessment which summarizes their tax situation for that year – income, deductions, credits, and tax payable.


In recent years, it seems that the arrival of spring has coincided with a natural or man-made disaster somewhere in Canada. Spring is also, of course, tax return preparation and filing season for most Canadian taxpayers, but it’s likely taxes were the last thing on the minds of families and individuals affected by this spring’s floods. And, in most cases, those families and individuals will not be penalized for failing, in such circumstances, to fulfill their tax obligations in a timely way.


For many years, post-secondary students have financed their educations in part through private savings and often in part through government student loans, which are generally interest-free while the student is in school. As well, the bulk of costs incurred to attend post-secondary education (or to finance it) have been eligible for a tax deduction or credit, at both the federal and provincial/territorial levels. Beginning in 2017, however, changes to that regime at both the federal level and in some provinces will mean changes to the way students (and their parents) pay for post-secondary education.  


If spring is the season for real estate sales in Canada, then summer is the time when all those real estate buyers and sellers pack up their belongings and move to their newly purchased homes. And, while buying a new home and making that move is usually something home buyers are doing by choice, that doesn’t make the actual process of moving any less stressful or costly.


Once they’ve completed and filed their 2016 tax return, most Canadians give a sigh of relief that the dreaded annual chore is done, and that income taxes will be out of sight and out of mind until the next filing deadline rolls around.

If all goes as planned, that is how events will unfold. In the best case scenario, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will issue a Notice of Assessment which indicates that the Agency agrees with the taxpayer’s summary of his or her income, deductions, credits, and taxes payable for the past year, and that it has no further questions or concerns. And, for the vast majority of Canadians, that is exactly how things will unfold. For many others, however, there will be a few more questions to be answered or steps to be taken before the tax filing and assessment process for the year is finally completed.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


Older taxpayers who have recently completed and filed their tax returns for 2016 may face an unpleasant surprise when that return is assessed. The unpleasant surprise may come in the form of a notification that they are subject to the Old Age Security “recovery tax” – known much more familiarly to Canadians as the OAS clawback.


As just about everyone knows, individual income tax returns for the 2016 tax year must be filed, by most Canadians, and any tax balance owed must be paid by all individual Canadians, on or before May 1, 2017. And, most Canadians do file that return, and pay any tax balance owed, on or before the deadline. As of April 24, 2017, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) had received just over 18 million individual income tax returns for the 2016 tax year. There are, however, a significant minority of Canadians who don’t file a return, or pay taxes owed (or both) by the annual deadline. The reasons for that are as varied as the individuals involved. In some cases, taxpayers are unable to pay a tax balance owing by the deadline and they think (wrongly) that there’s no point to filing a return where taxes owed can’t be paid. They may even think that they can fly “under the radar” and escape at least the immediate notice of the tax authorities by not filing the return. In other cases, it is just procrastination – virtually no one actually likes completing their tax return, especially where there’s the possibility of a tax bill to be paid once that return is done.


The Canadian tax system is in a constant state of change and evolution, as new measures are introduced and existing ones are “tweaked” through a never-ending series of budgetary and other announcements. However, even by normal standards, 2017 is a year in which there are larger than usual number of tax changes affecting individual taxpayers. And, unfortunately, most of those changes involve the repeal of existing tax credits which are claimed by millions of Canadian taxpayers.


For the majority of Canadians, the due date for filing of an individual tax return for the 2016 tax year is May 1, 2017. (Self-employed Canadians and their spouses have until June 15, 2017 to get that return filed.) In the best of all possible worlds, the taxpayer, or his or her representative, will have prepared a return that is complete and correct, and filed it on time, and the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) will issue a Notice of Assessment indicating that the return is “assessed as filed”, meaning that the CRA agrees with the information filed and tax result obtained by the taxpayer. While that’s the outcome everyone is hoping for, it’s a result which can be “short-circuited” in a number of ways.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one about personal issues, and one about corporate issues.


This month, millions of Canadians will receive unexpected mail from the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). That mail will contain an unfamiliar form—a 2015 Instalment Reminder. On that form, the CRA suggests to the recipient that he or she should make instalment payments of income tax on September 15 and December 15 2015, and will identify the amount which should be paid on each date.


Earlier this year, it was announced that the annual contribution limit to tax-free savings accounts (TFSAs) would be nearly doubled, increasing from $5,500 to $10,000, and that that increase would be effective for the 2015 and subsequent tax years.


This summer, millions of Canadians have been affected by a series of disasters ranging from forest fires to droughts and other kinds of severe weather, and many of those Canadians have been temporarily displaced from their homes and businesses as a result.


In October 2014, the federal government announced a number of changes to tax and benefit programs affecting families with young children. One such change altered the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) program, effective January 1, 2015, to increase the amount of that taxable benefit for families having children under the age of 6 and to create a new benefit for those with children aged 6 to 17. The first payment of the new or increased benefit was made in July, in the form of a lump sum payment representing the accrued benefits for the first half of 2015. Since then, this being an election year, there have been claims and counter-claims about the amount of the net benefit to Canadian families of the changes to the UCCB, and about the kind of tax planning families receiving that benefit need to undertake. The existing and new tax rules which determine the overall net benefit of the changes for Canadian families are as follows. 


The most interesting tax accountants in the universe